Sobriety Treatment and Recovery Teams

Funding: Each TA contract is funded by the individual jurisdiction.

The Sobriety Treatment and Recovery Teams (START) Model is a child welfare based intervention that has been shown, when implemented with fidelity, to improve outcomes for both parents and children affected by child maltreatment and parental substance use disorders.  START is listed on the California Evidence Based Clearinghouse as a model with promising research evidence.  

The START model is specifically designed to transform the system-of-care within and between child welfare agencies and substance use disorder (SUD) treatment providers; it also engages the judicial system and other family serving agencies. The broad goals of START are to keep children safely with their parents whenever possible and to promote parental recovery and capacity to care for their children.  

The START model aims to mitigate systems issues that result in barriers to families being able to access services in a timely manner. It requires an approach to service delivery that involves cross-system collaboration and flexibility to meet the unique needs of this population. The practices of the START Model align with collaborative strategies considered to be effective for families affected by parental substance use disorders and child maltreatment.

Children and Family Futures (CFF) is the national home for the training and technical assistance program of the START Model. For more information about START or to contact Tina Willauer, purveyor, please email START@cffutures.org.

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Goals and Outcomes of START

MISSION

Children and Family Futures strives to prevent child abuse and neglect while improving safety, permanency, well-being and recovery outcomes with equity for all children, parents and families affected by trauma, substance use and mental health disorders.

More About Who We Are
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children have parents who need treatment for a substance use disorder1
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children entered foster care during the 2018 fiscal year2
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of those who need treatment services for a substance use disorder do not receive them3

EXPERTISE

CFF News You Can Use

Through federally- and foundation-funded projects, Children and Family Futures and its small business subsidiary, Center for Children and Family Futures, produces publications, reports, Technical Assistance tools and web-based learning for the field. The following are featured resources from our work. For more resources or information related to a specific topic, please visit our resources page or click the “Request Assistance” button below or at the top of the page.

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  • The National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare’s (NCSACW) Working with Adolescents: Practice Tips and Resource Guide offers tips for child welfare workers, treatment providers, and other professionals.

  • NCSACW developed the Building Collaborative Capacity Series to provide states and communities with strategies to create cross-systems collaborative teams, communication protocols, and practice innovations. These strategies aim to improve screening, assessment, and engagement to best serve families affected by substance use disorders (SUDs) and child welfare service involvement.

  • Putting Ideas into Action – Knowledge Application Series provides nine lessons from the Prevention and Family Recovery Initiative funded by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and The Duke Endowment.

  • Dialogue with the Expert with Carla Carter from the Office of Civil Rights will discuss the latest medication-assisted resource, Exploring Civil Rights Protections for Individuals in Recovery from an Opioid Use Disorder, a five-part video and webinar series. 

FOCUS AREAS

  1. Lipari RN, & Van Horn SL (2017). Children living with parents who have a substance use disorder.
  2. United States. (2019). The AFCARS report. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Children’s Bureau.
  3. McCance-Katz, E. F. (2018). The National Survey on Drug Use and Health: 2018.