National Quality Improvement Center  for Collaborative Community Court Teams

Funded By: Administration on Children, Youth and Families – Children’s Bureau

Site Selection FAQs

On December 13th and 19th, 2017 the Quality Improvement Center for Collaborative Community Court Teams (QIC-CCCT) convened two webinars to provide a summary of the project and information about the application and site selection process. Below is a list of questions that registrants submitted and our corresponding responses.  The questions are organized by topic.

The Request for Proposals (RFP) can be accessed here.

To watch the webinars, please click here.

State, CIP/TCIP, or Tribal Government versus Local Court Application and Selection Process

The QIC-CCCT will select a total of 15 demonstration sites.  Demonstration sites are local court teams.  If a state, CIP/TCIP, or tribal government applies as lead on behalf of local court teams within their jurisdiction and is selected by the QIC-CCCT, the proposed local courts within their jurisdiction will be funded and counted towards the 15 total demonstration sites.

The QIC-CCCT will provide funding to the CIP/TCIP offices for distribution to the local courts. If the CIP/TCIP is unable to distribute these funds, they will be provided directly to the demonstration site. Either option would require a Mutually Binding Agreement between the QIC-CCCT and CIP/TCIP as the applicant to receive demonstration site funds.

States can submit an application that proposes up to three demonstration sites within the state.  The state would not be considered one site.  Rather, the proposed demonstration sites within the state would be considered sites.  Each demonstration site would be eligible for $70,000 per contract year to support their CCCT.

States, tribes, local courts, or partner agencies can be the applicant agency.  The implementing entity would be the local court and their local partners that make up the CCCT.

The local letters of commitment should be made to the lead local applicant agency that is a part of a Pathway 1 application. State letters of commitment should be made to the state level (CIP/TCIP or Tribal Government) Pathway 1 lead agency that is submitting on behalf of local courts in their jurisdiction.

Funding Provisions

Subject to QIC-CCCT Federal Project Officer approval, we would execute a Mutually Binding Agreement that would stipulate the use of demonstration site funds. We would not rule out the use of these funds for a coordinator in a state or tribe’s CIP for more than one demonstration site. Demonstration site funds cannot be used to supplant existing funds.

Applicants will be required to participate in the QIC-CCCT evaluation. This will include data collection and submission of agreed upon performance indicators. Demonstration sites are not required to include a local evaluator as a part of their budget, but must demonstrate the capacity to participate in the QIC-CCCT evaluation.

Funds are intended to support each local court team’s site plan implementation. Demonstration site funding cannot supplant existing funds. The QIC-CCCT envisions the funds will be used primarily to support project implementation, cross-systems training, and travel of the court’s team to the annual All-Sites Meeting.  More information on allowable use of funds will be provided in the Request for Proposals (RFP).

Demonstration sites’ goals should address the needs in the community and align with the goals of the QIC-CCCT program. During the first phase of the initiative, the QIC-CCCT Change Teams will help sites clearly define their needs, assess their current capacity, practice, and policies to implement the CARA requirements, and strengthen their collaborative capacity to serve parents and caregivers affected by substance use disorders, their infants, and children.

There is no monetary commitment to participate in this initiative.

There will be a required All-Sites Meeting in each year of the initiative, for a total of three meetings. We would expect the Core Team Partners to attend the All-Sites Meeting. That would include the listing of partners on page 16 of the RFP.

The indirect cost rate cap should be dictated by any existing federally negotiated cost rates. If an applicant has never had a negotiated indirect cost rate, they may use the de minimis rate of 10%. The appropriateness of indirect costs will also be determined on an individual basis based on the contents of the budget and budget narrative.

Technical Assistance and Evaluation Expectations and Approach

This will be a 30 month program. Please refer to the webinar for detailed information about each phase of the project.

The QIC TTA Team will work with tribal courts to identify appropriate performance indicators and measures of success. More information on evaluation expectations and the capacity to meet those expectations will be provided in the RFP.

The RFP will describe the expectations for demonstration sites.

The RFP will describe the technical assistance approach, including assigning a Change Liaison. Content expertise includes addressing the needs of infants and families affected by prenatal substance exposure, implementation of the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) as amended by the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA) of 2016, court operations, attorney engagement, tribal courts, culturally appropriate services, family-centered substance use disorder treatment, early intervention and child development, and cross-system collaboration including the medical community.

The RFP will provide more information on the QIC-CCCT training and technical assistance approach.

Demonstration sites will be required to participate in monthly site calls, annual onsite technical assistance, training, and coaching (TTAC) site visits, annual all-sites meetings (two days), and bi-monthly webinars. More information on these activities will be provided in the RFP.

Demonstration sites must include intensive collaboration among state and local level agencies including child welfare, CIPs, local courts, legal professionals, SUD prevention, and treatment (including medication-assisted treatment providers), mental health, hospitals, and primary, obstetrical, and pediatric health care. More information on partnership and collaboration expectations can be found in the orientation webinar and RFP.

The initiative is funded by the Children’s Bureau and operated by the Center for Children and Family Futures and its partners, the National Center for State Courts (NCSC) and Advocates for Human Potential (AHP). The QIC-CCCT will also draw on a team of expert consultants including the American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law, the Tribal Law and Policy Institute, and other nationally-recognized individuals. For more information about the initiative and our partners, please visit the website at https://www.cffutures.org/qic-ccct/

A primary goal of the QIC-CCCT is to sustain the effective collaborative partnerships, processes, programs, and procedures implemented during the initiative. The QIC TTA Team will assist demonstration sites in developing sustainability plans for the strategies implemented by the court team. Generally, this would include collaborative structures and practices; services provided to court participants, infants, and other family members; and collecting and analyzing core performance indicators to measure ongoing program effectiveness. It is expected that Core Team members representing their agencies will be actively engaged in developing sustainability strategies for practice changes that have demonstrated effectiveness.

Goals and Parallel Initiatives

Yes, one of the goals of the QIC-CCCT is to enhance the capacity of Collaborative Community Court Teams to implement the 2016 amendments to CAPTA pertaining to infants affected by prenatal substance exposure. The Center for Children and Family Futures, through the National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare, has provided technical assistance to 15 states, including a tribal consortium, on implementing this applicable section of CAPTA. The QIC-CCCT TTA Team will assist demonstration sites to align their work with statewide implementation of CAPTA.

Yes, the QIC-CCCT initiative can complement other initiatives such as the Statewide Systems Improvement Program, with a specific focus on addressing the needs of infants with prenatal substance exposure and their families, and CAPTA implementation. We intend for the QIC-CCCT to build on existing initiatives, not duplicate them.

Technical assistance from the QIC-CCCT Training and Technical Assistance (TTA) Team could support implementation of a family drug treatment docket that addresses the intent and goals of the QIC-CCCT initiative. Please refer to the orientation webinar for more information about the intent and goals of the initiative.

Site Selection Process

Applications will be due 30 days from their release date, which is expected to be in mid-January.

Technical assistance from the QIC-CCCT Training and Technical Assistance (TTA) Team could support implementation of a family drug treatment docket that addresses the intent and goals of the QIC-CCCT initiative. Please refer to the orientation webinar for more information about the intent and goals of the initiative.

A Collaborative Community Court Team (CCCT) is defined as a collaboration between the dependency court and other community partners (includes the listing of partners on page 16 of the RFP) working with children and families involved in the child welfare system and whom have agreed on goals that support the goals of the QIC-CCCT initiative (QIC-CCCT goals can be found on page 1 of the RFP). CCCTs can be new (established for the purposes of this initiative) or existing partnerships. More on the essential components and best practices of CCCTs can be found in the Expectations section of the RFP.

Either of the teams listed above could serve as a Collaborative Community Court Team under the QIC-CCCT RFP. The RFP also allows for a Collaborative Community Court Team to be established to serve the target population outlined in the RFP.