Prototypes 2017-07-25T21:28:54+00:00

Prototypes

Prepared for: Prototypes Women’s Center

Healthy Children Strong Families

The Health Children Strong Family (HCSF) program is a demonstration project funded by the Children’s Bureau Abandoned Infants Assistance Act to provide family-centered residential substance abuse treatment to mothers who have or at risk of losing their children. A key distinction of the HCSF program in comparison to traditional client-focused substance abuse treatment is the active role family members will have in treatment planning process. By incorporating family members into the treatment process, HCSF hopes to address situational barriers to sobriety often faced by clients re-entering the community after treatment, but typically not incorporated into client-focused treatment programs.


CFF was included in the original proposal to the Children’s Bureau to be the evaluator of the HCSF program. The evaluation includes a process component, an outcome component and an impact component. The process component of the evaluation assesses the implementation of the program, system integration and service delivery. The outcome evaluation aims to answer questions about the short-term impacts families in HCSF experienced. The impact component of the evaluation looks at the cost of the HCSF program in relation to traditional treatment programs and attempts to provide insight on replicating and sustaining family-centered treatment services offered through HCSF.

 

Achieving Recovery through Coordinated Care

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA), Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) funded ARCC through its Pregnant and Postpartum Women (PPW) grant. Project ARCC will enhance Prototype’s capacity to meet the needs of pregnant and postpartum women in Los Angeles who need residential substance abuse treatment. ARCC will support women’s successful recovery with coordinated, evidence-based services and by meeting the needs of her family network. ARCC will demonstrate how women’s recovery is improved and sustained when her family is well.


Similar to HCSF, CFF was included in the original proposal to SAMHSA to be the evaluator of ARCC. Also, similar to HCSF, the evaluation includes a process component, an outcome component and an impact component. The process component of the evaluation assesses the implementation of the program, system integration and service delivery. The outcome evaluation aims to answer questions about the short-term impacts families in HCSF experienced. The impact component of the evaluation looks at the cost of the HCSF program in relation to traditional treatment programs and attempts to provide insight on replicating and sustaining family-centered treatment services offered through HCSF.